Christy and David’s DC Courthouse Wedding

Christy and David’s love story is one filled with spontaneity, adventure, and a deep connection that led them to embark on an extraordinary journey towards their courthouse elopement in the heart of Washington, D.C.

From the moment they met, it was clear that Christy and David had an undeniable chemistry. They shared common interests, similar values, and a shared zest for life. Their relationship blossomed quickly, and it wasn’t long before they knew they wanted to spend the rest of their lives together.

However, Christy and David were not ones for traditional wedding ceremonies. They preferred something intimate and authentic, a celebration that reflected their personalities and their love for each other. That’s when they decided on a courthouse elopement in the vibrant and historic city of Washington, D.C.

The decision to elope in a courthouse was not taken lightly. Christy and David wanted their special day to be focused solely on their commitment to each other, devoid of the distractions that often come with traditional weddings. They wanted an intimate affair that allowed them to exchange heartfelt vows in a simple yet meaningful setting with their closest friends and family.

Post-ceremony portraits

Following the ceremony, the newlyweds ventured out into the streets of Washington, D.C., hand-in-hand, to capture the essence of the city and commemorate this extraordinary day. They explored iconic landmarks, such as the National Mall, cherishing every moment and creating lasting memories. Because of the rain, we had to use our plan B and seek refugee in the National Gallery of Art.

To celebrate with their family, they gathered at an intimate restaurant to celebrate their love and union. Laughter, toasts, and heartfelt speeches filled the room, as loved ones expressed their happiness for the couple and wished them a lifetime of happiness.

Christy and David’s DC courthouse elopement was a testament to their love and commitment. It was a celebration of their unique bond, a reflection of their desire for a simple yet profound start to their married life. In the end, they proved that love knows no boundaries and true happiness can be found in the most unexpected places.

How to get a DC marriage license

  1. Determine eligibility: Make sure you and your partner meet the eligibility requirements. You both must be at least 18 years old or if younger, have parental consent. Additionally, you don’t need to be a resident of Washington, D.C. to apply!

  2. Gather necessary documents: Prepare the required documents. You will need valid identification, such as a driver’s license, passport, or birth certificate, to prove your age and identity. If you were previously married, a divorce decree or death certificate may be required to show its termination.

  3. Complete the application: Fill out the marriage license application form. You can find the form online on the official website of the District of Columbia’s Marriage Bureau or obtain it in person from the Marriage Bureau.

  4. Schedule an appointment: Contact the Marriage Bureau to schedule an appointment. Walk-ins may be accommodated, but it’s best to have an appointment to ensure a smooth process. The Marriage Bureau is located at the Moultrie Courthouse, 500 Indiana Avenue NW, Room 4485, Washington, D.C.

  5. Provide information and take an oath: At the Marriage Bureau, you will be required to provide certain information, such as your full legal name, social security numbers, addresses, and occupations. You will also take an oath affirming the accuracy of the information provided.

  6. Obtain the marriage license: After the completion of the application process, the Marriage Bureau will issue your marriage license. It’s important to review the license for any errors or inaccuracies.

  7. Waiting period and validity: In Washington, D.C., there is no waiting period before you can use your marriage license. However, keep in mind that you must have your ceremony within the District of Columbia to be legally recognized.

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